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ObijuanKenobe
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Rain and inclement weather....

Mon Nov 20, 2006 2:30 pm

I was just wondering, as I stare out at yet another rainy autumn day in Holland:

Has anyone worked out a way to fly in the rain? I know it's generally not "allowed", but we all know that lightning is pretty rare this time of year. Why not, really? Certainly if they can swim in the ocean, they can fly in a fresh rain. And if I can bike comforably for 30min to work in raingear, why can't I fly for 2 hours in rain gear? With the wind at my back, it would be quite comfortable.

I guess I will need new lines? Has anyone perfected this? Has anyone tried fishing line, or other high tech materials to produce water-proof lines?

Just a bit of day-dreaming/pseudothinking.

obi
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Tony S
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 3:12 pm

Stand in a muddy field with normal kite and lines. Wear lots of very waterproof clothing, and be prepared for soggy feet and hands.

I have done a number of team practice sessions where you really don't want to be outside, but have planned for that day so you fly anyway. As long as thunder is not about there is no reason not to fly !

It does get miserable after a while though .....

Tony
 
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Infinitive
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 4:45 pm

I fly fairly often in rain! Just this afternoon I was getting my fix in the rain. The chances of lightning are infinitesimal...

The kite gets noticably heavier, lines bind easily, people think you are even madder than they last presumed - but if the wind is good these things (and even wet feet) fade to nothing. 8)
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ObijuanKenobe
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 4:53 pm

Yeah, that's what I wanted to hear! Now...what about lines? Can I just set them on the radiator to dry while on the winder?? (This is why I asked about fishing line...I used to use it for SLK back in my younger years.)
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Infinitive
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:03 pm

I dry them on a windowsill or on a radiator if it is cold. It probably isn't great for them but I only use quite knackered lines in the rain anyway - once they are sopping wet they bind whether new or old. If they are dirty I wash them in soapy water - also good for getting the salt from sea-spray off lines. I wash and dry them on the winder, as I'm not a fan of 100 foot long knots.

Fishing line, being one filament, will break the moment it gets any minor damage. I imagine it is also stretchy, compared to flying line.
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mobius
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 6:08 pm

The best purchase i ever made was buying waterproof shoes. With waterproof gear you really get what you pay for..

You don't need specialist lines. Do ensure you dry all your gear immediately.. all kites put up to dry.
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mavave
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 7:14 pm

Fro my experience the only waterproof shoes are rainboots with pants over it. W
With Gore-tex and the like you will get wet feet eventually. The vapor from humidity is always getting in. i'm sounding not that negative, but i do love these stuff too, and agree with 'get what you pay for'.
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Craig
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 7:49 pm

mavave wrote:
With Gore-tex and the like you will get wet feet eventually.


Really, something must be wrong with yours, my Gore-tex boots are at least 3 years old and I've never got wet feet.
 
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Gary Matthews
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 8:56 pm

Add a pair of Sealskinz socks....to the Goretex boots...Voila!!!
 
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kareloh
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 9:22 pm

Offtopic:

Infinitive wrote:
Fishing line, being one filament, will break the moment it gets any minor damage. I imagine it is also stretchy, compared to flying line.


That's monofil indeed, but most freshwater lure-fishing (for pike, perch, zander...) is done with braided dyneema lines. No stretch, total control and contact with the lure.

See links:
http://www.powerpro.com/using/index.asp
http://www.berkley-fishing.com/cat.php?k=50275&sk=50275

Offtopic 2:
I need some waterproof shoes as well. Good idea for a new topic:
http://www.fracturedaxel.co.uk/phpBB2/v ... highlight=
 
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ObijuanKenobe
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 9:37 pm

@Carlo:

I only see a hollow braid for salt water fishing (leaders and such) of a suitable strength, or am I reading these strengths incorrectly? In that case, it would be a pretty expensive experiment to try this stuff out on a kite. Still, I am intrigued.

Can you point me to a braid of 100lbs/40kg strength I could try for under 20euros? Are you ordering any fishing equipment soon? ;)
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kareloh
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Mon Nov 20, 2006 10:01 pm

Well, the strenght should be accurate.

For fishing, the Powerpro is probably the best choice. It's being copied in china (lot's of fake powerpro on the net) so beware.

You could choose to try Spiderwire, 14.95 per 100 meters:
http://www.goedkopervissen.nl/product_i ... ts_id/7770

But then again, why bother, for the price of 2 beers (extra) you can get a extra set of dyneema flying lines.
 
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Miles F
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Sat Sep 08, 2007 9:40 pm

Done some flying in one of the rare snowstorms we get in the UK, nothing violent you understand just a nice gentle fall of snow and light breeze. Same as the rain for the gear you need to wear plus gloves.

Interesting to see where the kite iced up though, the bridle and spars got affected most of all (you'd kind of guess they would) but very little on the leading edges and sail and practically nothing on the lines.

Enjoyed it, it was errr..... cool?
A NOHD will be published for the DS in due course, till then wear sunnies.
 
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Sun Sep 09, 2007 7:40 am

Most fishing line is designed to take on water and sink, so there's no benefit to using it. I looked at lots of brands and it just doesn't compare to proper flying line. Have flown all winter using Shanti. :thumbsup:
Rob
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