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DaveyH
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practice line length

Mon Aug 10, 2009 10:12 am

Hi All

Have been keeping the kite in the air for some months now getting used to the control of turns, stalls, landings etc and have started to practice tricks like the 540 and axle. I am stuggling with the lines fowling or wrapping around the tips. I believe you are best starting with shorter lines so you can see what's happening to them.
Presently using 25 and 30 mt lines. What length is best to learn tricks?
Cheers :D
 
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ObijuanKenobe
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Mon Aug 10, 2009 10:45 am

By my guestimated unofficial FA standards, I think 25-30m would be considered an appropiate competition length, but quite long on average for this little group of tricksters when not competing.

obi
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Will S
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Mon Aug 10, 2009 1:57 pm

I like 30m lines for freestyle kites. I begin to lost a bit of connection with their light inputs on anything longer.
I like flying polyvalent kites on 38m lines.

The longer the lines the easier it is to trick up until you begin to lose connection. The kite has a much larger window so you don't have to go through the same shenanigans as you would on shorter lines.
 
Stan Doff
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Mon Aug 10, 2009 2:23 pm

Try it.
Stuck for space,I once temporarily shortened some 25m lines to about 15m by pulling them through the leaders and taping up the spare line into a bundle.
 
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SteveC
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Mon Aug 10, 2009 2:30 pm

I generally fly 25m lines. Shorts lines are great for seeing what is happening but they don't give you much time to react. As Stan says, try it and see. As for tip wraps, as I see it, it's a bit like broken spars, everyone gets 'em but you just get more when your learning! ( also depends on the kite to some extent).
 
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kevspilly
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Mon Aug 10, 2009 8:03 pm

540 and axle. I am stuggling with the lines fowling or wrapping around the tips.

Try flying with at least one twist in your line, also a yoyo line may help.
You could also try getting your nose down a bit further before any rotation. What kite are you flying by the way?

Usually though this is a not enough slack with the non popping hand problem.

Line length is not normally a factor, I fly mainly at 20M as that is how wide my flying beach is at high tide.
All that matters in life is kite flying, love and work ….preferably in that order.

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TobyR
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Mon Aug 10, 2009 10:40 pm

Shorter lines might not help reduce tip wraps, but they certainly shorten the walk of shame when you get one ;)
Shorter lines are definitely better in light airs though, which is also good conditions for learning tricks.
Mostly, though, it's just a matter of timing and slack and practice and more practice. Keep at it!

Toby
 
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Aeri
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Mon Aug 10, 2009 10:49 pm

shorter lines are allso better on crowdy beaches
Old school was a great school
 
DaveyH
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Tue Aug 11, 2009 12:16 am

Thanks for the comments, it would seem the 25 mt is good to practice with but I am interested by kevspilly's comments. What effect does having a twist in the line have? I have a fury in the bag but have been practicing with a HQ Breeze as the winds have been light recently. I take it the fury would have the same effect as a twist due to its yo yo line but again I am interested as to how this helps to stops fouling of lines. Again thanks for the comments.
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kareloh
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Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:24 am

Currently using 30-35 meters for freestyle kites and 40 meters for the comp. kites.
 
damp_weather
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Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:28 am

DaveyH wrote:
Thanks for the comments, it would seem the 25 mt is good to practice with but I am interested by kevspilly's comments. What effect does having a twist in the line have? I have a fury in the bag but have been practicing with a HQ Breeze as the winds have been light recently. I take it the fury would have the same effect as a twist due to its yo yo line but again I am interested as to how this helps to stops fouling of lines. Again thanks for the comments.

For me, the yoyo line on the Fury (0.85) makes tip wraps more frequent and much more difficult to remove. It seems too easy to have the leader line pulling to one side of the sail and the yoyo line to the other. Without a yoyo line, then I can usually fly out of the situation.

Regarding twists in the line helping avoid tip wraps - twists usually don't make things worse. For example, if there is a tipwrap, the leader lines (almost?) always pull the same way across the sail. And for rollups where it is important that the lines don't fall too far down the leading edges, they can help a lot as a they keep the lines close to the centre of the kite.
 
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Craig
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Tue Aug 11, 2009 10:25 am

Tip-wraps are generally caused by not enough slack, learn to manage the slack and you'll be fine, line length has little to no effect on this. Short lines for fast furious tricking, long for everything else. I usually use 100' except occasional 85' beach flying.
 
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stuartF
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Tue Aug 11, 2009 10:27 am

I learned (perfected would be an overstatement) 540s and Slots with an InnerSpace on 8m lines. At that distance, and with a slow old skool kite, and when you make your own wind by walking backwards (not via baked beans ;) ), you can see exactly what's going on.
When I tried the tricks again with a STD or UL on 25m lines, everything just came together.

Stuart
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kevspilly
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Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:25 pm

I am interested by kevspilly's comments. What effect does having a twist in the line have?

This keeps the lines together and stops them drifting on there own in the wind. This tends to happen on the beach with wind of the sea with light lines.

IMO I think your real problem is your nose is not flat enough and your slack management. Try thrusting the non popping arm forward and down then taking a step forward after popping the input.
All that matters in life is kite flying, love and work ….preferably in that order.

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DaveyH
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Tue Aug 11, 2009 10:48 pm

Brilliant. Have a few ideas now to take with me this week end. Hope the winds a little stronger than it has been . I understand the comments about slack management.
As a beginner at the tricks everything seems a bit of a blur with the timing of pops and the feeding of the line to create slack. As with everything practice practice and practice and all will slow down.
There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the view is always the same.